Writing for Children

Leveled Reading in Writing for Children

Feb 7th, 2017 | By
leveled readers

An important and unique aspect of writing for children is that authors need to be aware of and consistently apply established rules for making manuscripts age-appropriate. However, at the same time, it’s important to remember that the rules and leveling tools that are available are of limited value in helping



Writing to Get Your Children’s Story Published

Feb 2nd, 2017 | By
get your children's story published

All writers, including children’s writers, have one primary focus – to get published. What makes each writer different is his slant or perspective on the story he’s telling, and how he tells it. It’s true that anyone can write, but writing to get published is another story. To accomplish this,



One Writer’s New Years Resolutions

Jan 20th, 2017 | By
new years resolutions

It’s hard to believe that another year just flew by… it seems that the older I get, the faster they fly! As always, on New Year’s Day, I, like many other people, think about those time-honored New Year’s resolutions. Last year, I made only two major resolutions – to find



Using Fairy Tales from Around the World to Craft New Children’s Stories – Infograph

Jan 17th, 2017 | By
fairy tales from around the world

Fairy Tales from Around the World Authors of children’s stories often pull from mythology to help them craft simplistic morality tales. We’ve all heard about Cinderella, the Three Little Pigs, the Princess and the Frog, and Humpty Dumpty plenty of times, with in multiple iterations. We’ve even



Make Your Children’s Writing Website Focused

Jan 3rd, 2017 | By
children's writing website

Is your site on the mark? As we get caught up in our writing careers sometimes it’s easy to forget to remain focused. That’s a no-no! It’s important to present a focused brand and site. Okay, so what are three website must-haves and six tips? Note: While this article focuses



The Benefits of Rhyme

Dec 10th, 2016 | By
benefits of rhyme

Twas the night before Christmas, and all through the house… Twinkle twinkle, little star… Little Bo Peep has lost her sheep… Most of us can recite at least the first stanza of each of these well-known poems/rhymes, even if we have not heard or spoken the words for many years.



A Poem, Thanksgiving, and Writing for Children

Nov 16th, 2016 | By
children's thanksgiving poem

November, of course, brings Americans to think about the Thanksgiving holiday and its meaning beyond elaborate turkey dinners (or for those of us who do not eat meat, elaborate tofu-turkey dinners). A poem I wrote that was recently published in the literary magazine Stinkwaves Magazine is not directly related to



Writers – Fill Your Own Shoes

Oct 18th, 2016 | By
what children's publishers are looking for

I recently read several independent blog posts by editors and literary agents about book submissions they have received in which the cover letter included claims that the author envisioned him or herself as the next J.K. Rowling, Maurice Sendak, Dr. Seuss, or other best-selling author. The problem with these submissions,



Point of View and Children’s Storytelling

Sep 27th, 2016 | By
point of view in children's stories

by Karen Cioffi Point-of-view (POV) is the narrator’s view of what’s going on. The POV is who’s telling the story. This will determine what the reader ‘hears’ and ‘sees’ in regard to the story. And, it determines the ‘personal pronouns’ that will be used. There are three main POVs in



Keeping Personal Bias Out of Educational Nonfiction

Sep 9th, 2016 | By
avoiding-personal bias in educational nonfiction

Avoiding Personal Bias in Educational Nonfiction by Melissa Abramovitz Most of my work involves writing educational nonfiction books and magazine articles for children and teenagers, and over the years I’ve learned that one of the most difficult aspects of this type of writing is keeping my personal opinions out of



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